Theme – The theme of this book is the importance of having a dream; each member of the Younger family is obsessed with their dream. Similarities in Characters, Setting, Plot, or Theme to other Books I have Read – A book that is similar to A Raisin in the Sun is, To Kill a Mockin… Prejudice and discrimination is one of the minor theme in the play, but can’t be forgotten.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

She was self-centered at the beginning of the playmaking the family sacrifices their desires to accommodate her expensive hobbies, which keep changing from time to time. Her love interests George Murchison, and Joseph Asagai influences her life choices. George was a wealthy black man who tries to ignore the accomplishments of black people and fit into this white-dominated society and a narcissist who shows off in front of Beneatha by talking about intellectual concepts. A Raisin in the Sun, a play by Lorraine Hansberry, is the story of a lower-class African American family living on the Southside of Chicago during the 1950s. The family seeks to move into a home in a White middle-class neighborhood.

A Raisin In The Sun: Summary, Characters, Themes & Analysis

The Younger’s are an impoverished African American family that struggles to make ends meet. Walt Disney once said “If you can dream it you can achieve it.” Dreams have a great importance in A Raisin in the Sun, with the play’s name coming from a 1951 Langston Hughes poem titled Harlem. Money and acquisitiveness have always had the ability to turn people into someone they are not. Greed can tear apart families and friendships when a person neglects others for their own benefit.

By the play’s end, Beneatha’s basic dream of fulfillment is intact. It appears that she might never be a doctor but she is going to Africa with Asagai and will get to experience a new continent, a government and society run by black people, and an adventurous life. The dream matters to Lena because she lived through the difficult time in which many blacks left the South and moved North to make life better john donne a hymn to god the father for themselves. At that point, they were concerned with more basic human needs like food, shelter, safety, employment and dignity. Consequently, she wants basic well-being for her family, even as they pursue dreams beyond hers.

Generational Disparity In Hansberry’s A Raisin In The Sun

The snow-covered monument to Wellington comes to Gabriel’s mind when he thinks of going outside; a theme of nature occurring once again. Gabriel’s grandfather riding his horse, Johnny over and over again around the statue of William III, conqueror of Ireland on behalf of England is another sign of nature. “The Dead” connects paralysis with the English and with the theme of nature. Gabriel suffers from paralysis, at least somewhat because of his lure to things English.

Facing segregation and housing discrimination, African Americans cultivated what I call homemade citizenship—a deep sense of success and belonging that does not rely on mainstream recognition or civic inclusion. Walter’s obsession in investing in a liquor store completely took over causing him to detach from his job, loves ones, and his reality so that he could give complete attention to his dream. What he doesn’t realize is how devastating this could be to his life and whoever is involved. Walter’s selfishness leads him to sacrifice Beneatha’s dreams of becoming a doctor, because he feels that her dreams aren’t important.

  • Ruth contemplates an abortion because she believes this decision would be in the best interest of her family.
  • She is eager to learn about African culture, language, music, and dress.
  • Director Petrie, although he attempts to embody the theme of the obligation of society to fight racial discrimination, he takes a far more passive approach than Lorraine Hansberry.
  • These aspects of nature reveal much about the inner character of mama.
  • Filling up your heads ̶ [counting off on his fingers.] ̶ with the sociology and the psychology”.

They detest Walter for dealing with his dead fathers money so easily and feel that he has lost his soul when he days we wants to be bought out by the white Mr. Lindner. The African-American experience of growing up in America changed dramatically throughout the course of the twentieth century, thus leading to differing views between the older and younger generations. In Lorraine Hansberry’s play, A Raisin in the Sun, the character of Mama was raised during a point in time when racial prejudice was prevalent and blacks had virtually no opportunity to live out their dreams. The younger generation’s concept of the American dream reflects the changing times and the new opportunities that are now available for African-Americans. As a result of this generation gap, Mama and her children view the issues of religion, career choice, and abortion from extremely different angles, leading to much tension and anger in their relationship.

‘The Little Foxes’ brought her greater fame and reflects her opinion of and her remembrances of the South (kirjasto.sci.fi). It is the last thing Mama carries out of the apartment when the family moves, symbolizing the family’s failure to thrive in their neighborhood. Both the plant and the Younger family are expected to blossom in their new surroundings. It contains thousands of paper examples on a wide variety of topics, all donated by helpful students. You can use them for inspiration, an insight into a particular topic, a handy source of reference, or even just as a template of a certain type of paper.

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